Brew Q & A: Piña Agria

We caught up with Brewhouse manager, Bill Beymer, to discuss our latest Cellar Series release Piña Agria. Here’s what we learned:

Q: What was the inspiration behind Piña Agria?

A:  Our Resident Engineer, Matt Bailey, dreamed this one up more than two years ago.  He had a feeling the pineapple fruit would work well with the sour brewing process so he put together a recipe.  He first brewed this beer on his home brew system and he realized how well the flavors complement one another.  He then scaled the recipe up and brewed it on our 5 Barrel Pilot System and voila! A new Cellar Series beer was born.

Pina Agria 1

Q:  What are some key flavors you taste in this beer?

A: Pineapple is the first thing you smell when you bring it up to your nose and it mingles harmoniously with the sour lactobacillus and the earthy brettanomyces in the beer.  As your tongue first touches the beer you receive a pleasantly acidic shock to your tastebuds and immediately after you will begin to feel a warming sensation working its way through your entire body.  The pineapple and lactobacillus continue to dance pirouettes on your taste buds as you experience other tropical flavors like guava and passion fruit.  You may also taste the subtle sweet breadiness of the malt as it vies for your attention amidst the pineapple tartness.


Q: How was the brewing process for this different from the typical brewing process?

A:  The sour brewing process is not always an easy one to execute, and it can take a long time.  There are always a lot of variables that can make it extremely difficult and it is critical that we keep the entire process isolated and controlled.  The base beer is brewed and initially fermented just like most of our other brews in our brew house.  Once primary fermentation is complete, we introduce a “cocktail” of lactobacillus and pineapple juice and the souring process begins.  This cocktail or sour stock is made up separately from the base beer and we make sure that the acidity and flavor of it is exactly the way we want it.  The sour stock will sometimes be a mix of samples from other barrels that we have aging in our Woodside facility.  In the case of the Pina Agria, it began with a small sample from just one barrel.  While tasting Friek barrels last year, Matt identified one barrel that would be perfect for his original pineapple sour so he collected a small portion of it to use with his homebrew.  Once you have developed your ideal blend, you can add unfermented wort to it and grow it to the volume necessary to sour the entire large batch.  All along the way, you have to maintain proper temperatures to enable the lactobacillus to stay healthy and you have to be vigilant with cleanliness in and around the vessel it is residing in.  Ultimately, the process can take many months and sometimes years to complete but sour beer fans will all agree, it is well worth the wait.

Pina Agria 3

Check our beer finder to find Piña Agria near you!

Brew Q & A: Brazzle – Sour Golden Raspberry

Brazzle! Brazzle! Brazzle! The release is finally near! On Friday, February 27, Odell Brewing Co., will be releasing this Sour Golden Raspberry. Brazzle has been a long time coming and let me tell you… It has been worth the wait!

Brazzle 1We sat down with our Barrel Aging/Pilot System Manager Brent Cordle to talk about the inspiration behind this sweet, sour.


Q: What was the inspiration behind Brazzle?

A: This beer was originally born on the pilot system a while back.  We did a small batch and threw in whole raspberries to see what would happen.  It was a tasty sour the first time, so we wanted to re-create something similar.



Q: What was involved in the brewing process?Brazzle 2

A: The initial brewing was simple. We brewed a Golden Ale at a higher mash temperature to keep some of the sugars from breaking down.  Other yeasts can break down the sugars later in the fermentation process, giving it those unique flavors.  It was the secondary fermentation process that was more time consuming.  We used former Woodcut barrels for the aging process which took a little over two years. The lacto and acidity weren’t where we wanted them to be initially. This beer took longer to mature, but it was WELL worth the wait! It’s a delicious beer. I’m very proud of the way this beer turned out.




Q:  What are some key flavors you taste in this beer?

A: Raspberry… obviously.  But, I don’t get the tartness that comes from red raspberries.  We used golden raspberries to brew with which gives this sour a little more sweetness.  There is also a light, tart peach flavor that comes through as well as lemon citrus.  The acidity from the lemon plays with the sweet raspberry flavor.  This is a very unique sour.  I’d recommend getting a bottle (or two) while you can!


Brazzle 3


Check our calendar of events for the Tap Room release party for Brazzle.  This Cellar Series Beer will hit shelves the first week of March!

Want to learn more about your favorite Odell Beer?  E-mail for a Brew Q & A request!

Saboteur: Brett Barrel Brown Ale

Odell Brewing Co. Saboteur Brett Barrel Brown Ale is like no other brettanomyces beer, it’s warming alcohol, smooth oak, roasted caramel malts, and refreshing pineapple nose are simply “Good.”

Good That s pretty much what this beer is. Oh, define it? Hm… well that’s tough because the Brits had all the resources to make this beer, that is if they would have only been willing to embrace the “crazy” Belgian techniques of the day when Big Brown Ales were substituted for meals by the Queen’s people. Instead, we as American Craft Brewers here in Northern Colorado, now get the chance to brew a style defying beer that embraces both our English brewing heritage as well as our Belgian-esque creativity…because, after-all, we can only brew “English-Style” beers for so long before we turn our back on tradition. As for the beer…well, it fills your nose with a bright fresh pineapple character and light peppery notes contributed from the brettanomyces yeast we add to both the fermentor and American Oak Barrels. Over time this pineapple character will continue to grow and evolve, providing a slightly dryer finished product and a more complex dried fruit character. The malt contributes rich caramel and toffee flavors with a soft warming alcohol character that exists harmoniously with the pineapple. Saboteur benefits from our Brewers’ careful selection of oak barrels with which we age a percentage of Saboteur before carefully blending the proper amount of barrel-aged beer back to provide a soft, vanilla mouthfeel which complements the slightly bitter roasted caramel malts. Add raisin, toffee and a slightly sour finish and you have defined “Good.” After buying a bottle of this beer, stop by your local butcher for a 1/2 pound of Buffalo Corned Beef and then by your local baker for a loaf of Marbled Rye, return home and enjoy a glass of Saboteur with a Reuben on your back patio as the evening draws to a close and the spring sun sets over the foothills.

ABV: 10.0 %
IBU: Doesn’t really matter because it is slightly soured